End-Grain Cobbles                                                Back to Home Page

 

This is a hard wearing, very natural and sustainable floor fitted in a set of engineering workshops.  The company who own the workshops always use such floors in their workshops throughout Europe.    Remember these are all produced from locally grown Welsh Softwoods.  Grown near Llandrindod Wells, sawn into boards in Usk and Wentwood then dried and machined at our workshop in Wentwood.  Each cobble is 110mm X 70mm and 75mm high.  These were fitted by a very experienced solid wood flooring firm Shire Oak. 

 

PAR%20pics%20012

 

Of course when they are laid they have the joints staggered like a brick wall – this picture is some on a pallet.

 

But why not just have a cheap concrete floor?  There are lots of benefits; wooden cobbles are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cobbles in these photos are 75mm thick (3 inches) but any thickness can be produced from around 25mm upwards.  Thicker cobbles should be used in heavy workshop situations and thinner ones in lighter situations.

 

And here they are laid.  Don’t they look stunning?

 

Cobbles laid 1 cropped

 

If you would like to see some samples or learn more, feel free to visit us and discuss your project.

 

Broadly speaking they are ideal for situations of heavy wear and abuse, where looks are still important, where they might get an occasional wetting but not prolonged moisture.  Cobbles can be installed in workshops, classrooms, shops, restaurants, pubs, art studios, foyers and any number of public buildings.

 

What is the cost?  The maximum for a thick cobble (75mm) fully fitted onto an already flat concrete floor is around £110 per square metre; or at the other end of the scale, supply only of a thin cobble (say 35mm) around £40 per square metre.  VAT to be added to these prices.

 

And this is what 64 square metres of cobbles looks like when it arrives on site.

 

 

PAR%20pics%20009

 

Very few people in Britain are aware of this very old method of flooring.  It is quite unusual in the UK, but in many parts of the world it is quite common.  For more information feel free to get in touch with Gavin at Wentwood Timber Centre or Nick at Shire Oak.